Archive

“Entwining Greek with Asian Speech”: Studies on Timotheus of Miletus’The Persians

As a Research Fellow at Harvard University’s Center for Hellenic Studies, I am currently developing the results of a chapter of my dissertation with the aim of producing my first monograph in English, entitled: “Entwining Greek with Asian Speech”: Studies on Timotheus of Miletus’ The Persians. The goal of my book is to shed light, through an unprecedented interdisciplinary approach, on some understudied aspects of one of the most difficult… Read more

In Times of War and Crisis: Regional Identities and Greek Archaeology

Challenging the way we view the development of Greek archaeological practices, my book-length project, “In Times of War and Crisis: Regional Identities and Greek Archaeology,” examines the intersections of identity politics and archaeological praxis in Ottoman Macedonia and Crete prior to their incorporation into the Greek state in 1913. These contested states were influenced by the success of the Greek Revolution, and my long-term project traces the broader impacts of… Read more

Numbers, counting, and calculation in Attic oratory

My project studies the role of numbers, counting, and calculation in Attic oratory. At the CHS, I focused on two issues. The first is the relationship between numbers and prose style. In oratory, numbers tend to appear near the end of sentences, as they also do in inscriptions. This recurring organizational pattern encourages the audience to focus on the numbers and perhaps facilitates calculation. Numbers also lend themselves to stylistic… Read more

Odysseus in Aeschylean Drama: Revisiting the Fragments

Abstract During my year-long appointment as a CHS-AUTH fellow in Hellenic Studies, I had the opportunity to work on my research project: Odysseus in Aeschylean Drama: Revisiting the Fragments. In my paper I examine the highly fragmentary Aeschylean trilogy concerning Odysseus’ nostos, which consists of the plays Psychagogoi, Penelope, and… Read more

Women in medicine: an epigraphic research

The current study presents 28 epigraphic testimonies of women who practice medicine in a wide geographic area, such as: Attica, Macedonia, Thrace, Asia Minor and Hispania, from 3rd century BCE to 6th century CE, outlining at the same time the different terms used to articulate and refer to the medical… Read more

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