Abstract–Local Pantheons in Motion: Synoecism and Patron Deities in Hellenistic Rhodes

Abstract–Isocrates’ Theory of Goodwill (Eunoia) as a Precursor of Emotional Intelligence

Εunoia is one of Isocrates’ core paideutic concepts. In my article, I aim to show that if Isocratean philosophical and rhetorical pedagogy is meaningfully modified and combined with eunoia into a nuanced system of Emotional Intelligence (EI), applicable to internal and international politics and public relations, then eunoia emerges as a versatile, multifarious and interactive emotion and concept. In that sense, it comprises a special emotional configuration, resulting from the… Read more

Abstract–Painting, Ethics, and Ontology in Republic 5

In this paper I examine Plato’s use of the art of painting in the Republic, Book 5 as a metaphor for the integration of citizens in the harmonious society of the ideal city. In the Republic, Plato presents Socrates as a verbal painter who constructs a wide and diverse range of verbal images (eikones). The majority of these images are highly colorful, ornate and intricate. Yet, the Socratic images which… Read more

Abstract–The Actors’ Repertoire, Fifth-Century Drama and Early Tragic Revivals

This contribution deals with the theatrical afterlife of Euripides’ Telephus, Aeschylus’Edonians and Libation Bearers. The sources for their ancient reception share two features: (i) Classical dramatists recall the visual aspects of these plays, thus suggesting familiarity with their performance, decades after they premiered; and (ii) these tragedies can be consistently identified in the theatre-related records from the fourth century onwards. This pattern is probably not a coincidence. It suggests that these plays were reperformed around the… Read more

Abstract–Connecting People: Mobility and Networks in the Corpus of Greek Private Letters

The goal of this article is primarily to highlight the phenomenon of the communication trough letter-writing from the city to its territory, from territory to territory or towards the inland regions, as a most important form of mobility in the corpus of Greek private letters. Entrusted to close relations or simply to passing people, who in turn confide it to other acquaintances, the letter travels a distance that its senders… Read more

Abstract–The Social Dynamics of Dedication in the Delian Inventories of the Third Century: Audience, Function and Temporality

My project explores the social dynamics of dedication, as they are reflected in the dedications recorded in the Delian inventories during the third century BC. The Delian practice of annually producing inventories of dedications is quite exceptional. Very few sanctuaries produce regular publication of their inventories; the practice is restricted to Athens and Attica, Delos, and to a lesser extent Didyma. The inventories of Athenian and Attic sanctuaries have attracted… Read more

Abstract–To the Dregs: Drawing Meaning from the Rhodian Handles of Hellenistic Ashkelon

Rhodian amphorae, distinctive for their shape and their rose-stamped handles, are emblematic of specialized wine trade during the Hellenistic period. Their presence in quantity at sites throughout the Mediterranean has been used as a barometer for a city’s financial success and the wealth of its inhabitants, while sudden fluctuations have been correlated with commercial, political or even cultural change. This paper presents a preliminary study of the Rhodian stamped handles… Read more

Abstract–Seeing Hera in the Iliad

Hera is the most under-appreciated deity in the pantheon of Homer’s Iliad. Inseminating mortals with thoughts and understanding the secret plans of Zeus, Hera proves to be a goddess of the mind. Hera’s characteristic sphere of action is the phrénes, the realm of physiological, emotional, and intellectual activity. Hera’s own creative vision enlarges the imaginative scope of the epic – for her noetic mode of seeing brings unity to what is otherwise… Read more

Live Webcast: April 2015 Research Symposium

Join us on Friday, April 24 for a live webcast of the biannual Center for Hellenic Studies Research Symposium! The stream will be available at http://media.video.harvard.edu/core/live/harvard-chs-live.html. No special software is required. Persons interested in watching the stream should click on the link above and the stream will play in their web browser. Have questions for the presenters? Contact us via the online form or the live chat room. Friday, April 24 Session 1,… Read more

Poetic Authority and the Utility of Reproduction in Hesiod’s Theogony and Works and Days

Citation with persistent identifier: Hong, Yurie. “Poetic Authority and the Utility of Reproduction in Hesiod’s Theogony and Works and Days.” CHS Research Bulletin 3, no. 1 (2014). http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:HongY.Poetic_Authority_and_the_Utility_of_Reproduction.2014 1§1 Between the Theogony’s pronouncement that women are a “beautiful evil,” who “consume other people’s labor into their bellies” (Theogony 585, 599), the Works and Days’ identification of Pandora as the releaser of “baneful evils for humans” (Works and Days 67, 95), and the… Read more

Silence and Rumor as Rhetorical Strategies in Basil’s Letters

Citation with persistent identifier: Fowler, Ryan, and Quiroga-Puertas, Alberto. “Silence and Rumor as Rhetorical Strategies in Basil’s Letters.” CHS Research Bulletin 3, no. 1 (2014). http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:FowlerR_and_PuertasA.Silence_and_Rumor_as_Rhetorical_Strategies.2014 §1 In this paper, we analyze the relationship between silence and rumor in the letters of Basil of Caesarea (329 or 330-379 CE), one of the Cappadocian Fathers and a towering figure in the intellectual and religious milieu of the fourth century AD. Basil wrote in a… Read more

Minoan Communities and Commemorative Practices: The Late Prepalatial to Protopalatial Tholos Tomb A at Apesokari/Crete

Citation with persistent identifier: Flouda, Georgia. “Minoan Communities and Commemorative Practices: The Late Prepalatial to Protopalatial Tholos Tomb A at Apesokari/Crete.” CHS Research Bulletin 3, no. 1 (2014). http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:FloudaG.Minoan_Communities_and_Commemorative_Practices.2014 1§1 Charged with emotional content, the burial of the deceased is cross-culturally one of the social events that create the most powerful associations. Ancestor commemoration goes one step further, as it involves practices relating to the formation and maintenance of shared memories… Read more

A Stroll along the Sea: The Processional Way in Ephesus and the Littoral

Citation with persistent identifier: Feuser, Stefan. “A Stroll along the Sea: The Processional Way in Ephesus and the Littoral.” CHS Research Bulletin 3, no. 1 (2014). http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:FeuserS.A_Stroll_along_the_Sea.2014 1§1 Port cities played an essential role in the history of the ancient Mediterranean[1]. Due to their location they were the transition point for traffic between land and sea. It was here where the stream of goods, people and ideas was constricted. The geographer… Read more

A New Historical Grammar of Demotic Greek: Reflections on the Κοινή Ελληνική in the 19th and 20th Centuries as Seen through Thumb’s Handbook of…

Citation with persistent identifier: Janse, Mark, & Joseph, Brian. “A New Historical Grammar of Demotic Greek: Reflections on the Κοινή Ελληνική in the 19th and 20th Centuries as Seen through Thumb’s Handbook of the Modern Greek Vernacular.” CHS Research Bulletin 2, no. 2 (2014). http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:Janse_Joseph.What_Thumbs_Handbook_Tells_Us.2014 Introduction 1§1 In 1895, the German Hellenist, Sanskritist, Indo-Europeanist, and general historical linguist Albert Thumb (1865–1915), known also for his more classically oriented scholarship both in… Read more

Abstract–Poetic Authority and the Utility of Reproduction in the Theogony and Works and Days

This paper examines the rhetorical function of reproduction in the Theogony and the Works and Days. It is grounded in the dual observation that, while there is a great deal of overlap in the poems’ dominant attitudes about women and childbirth, 1) both poems engage with strains of a far more complicated discourse about the nature of reproduction and its role in shaping men’s lives, and 2) both selectively activate… Read more

Abstract–Silence and Rumor as Rhetorical Strategies in Basil's Letters

In this project we have analyzed the use of two non-technical communication strategies—rumor and silence—in the epistles of Basil of Caeserea. We have approached silence as Basil’s method to manage his self-image and his engagement with the theological landscape of the fourth century, and rumor as narrative strategy to alter the reputation of an enemy or to manipulate it for their own benefit. In effect, our study shows that rumor… Read more

Abstract–The Control of Emotion: Rhetorical Education and Civic Oratory in the Greco-Roman East

This paper focuses on the early stages of ancient rhetorical education, as a foundation for exploring the emotions involved in the composition and reception of ancient speeches in the Greek East of the Roman Empire in the early centuries AD. It concentrates on the progymnasmata, preliminary exercises in rhetorical composition, as evidenced by manuals, sample ‘fair copies’ of such exercises and school exercises on papyrus from Egypt. These sources are read as fragments… Read more

Abstract–Minoan Communities and Commemorative Practices: the Late Prepalatial to Protopalatial Tholos Tomb A at Apesokari/Crete

The presentation examines the communal Tholos Tomb A at Apesokari in south-central Crete as the diachronic locus of the commemorative practices employed by one of the kinship groups of the community inhabiting the nearby habitation site on Vigla hill. The commemorative practices are reconstructed through the layout and the burial assemblage of the tomb as a continuum of multi-staged mortuary rituals; these extend from the inhumation of the corpse to… Read more

Abstract–Atticist lexica and the pronunciation of Greek

It can be proven that Atticist lexica contain information on a special pronunciation of Greek, which the Atticists aimed at achieving as part of their training. The paper illustrates the ways in which the lexica point their readers to this pronunciation, and examines some glosses that witness ‘hyperatticising pronunciations’, some of which may even have been inadvertently adopted by the lexicographers themselves. Read more

Abstract–A stroll along the sea: The processional way in Ephesus and the littoral

Port cities played an essential role in the history of the ancient Mediterranean. Due to their location they were the transition point for traffic between land and sea. However, we are far away from understanding the spatial, functional, economic as well as social and cultural relevance of ancient port cities. With this paper concentrated on the city of Ephesus – located on the western shore of Asia Minor – I… Read more

Live Webcast: December 2014 Research Symposium

Join us on Saturday, December 6 for a live webcast of the biannual Center for Hellenic Studies Research Symposium! The stream will be available at rtsp://stream.chs.harvard.edu/HouseA, viewable with VLC Media Player or Quicktime 7. To connect via VLC, go to File > Open Network and paste the link into the URL field. For Quicktime 7, go to File > Open URL and paste in the link. Have questions for the presenters? Contact us via the online form or the… Read more

Trojan War by Homer: Retaliation, Narrative Order, and Cretan Focus

Citation with persistent identifier: Zecchin de Fasano, Graciela. “Trojan War by Homer: Retaliation, Narrative Order, and Cretan Focus.” CHS Research Bulletin 2, no. 2 (2014). http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:ZecchindeFasanoG.Trojan_War_by_Homer_Retaliation_Narrative_Order.2014 Introduction* 1§1 The retaliation war (Trojan War), the internal war of a genos for power and heritage (Theban War), the war for identity (Persian Wars), and finally, the war for the hegemony of one city (Peloponnesian War) were all painful, usual phenomena in the life of Ancient Greece.… Read more

Reclining with Callinus and Tyrtaeus: Martial Elegy in the Symposion

Citation with persistent identifier: Cazzato, Vanessa. “Reclining with Callinus and Tyrtaeus: Martial Elegy in the Symposion.” CHS Research Bulletin 2, no. 2 (2014). http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:CazzatoV.Reclining_with_Callinus_and_Tyrtaeus.2014 §1 That martial elegy, like all shorter elegy, belonged to (some form of) the symposion has become a matter of scholarly orthodoxy since Ewen Bowie formulated his powerful arguments to this effect almost thirty years ago.[1][2]  More recently, Elizabeth Irwin has offered a thorough analysis of… Read more

Placing the Muses: Eumelus fragments 34–35 (West)*

Citation with persistent identifier: Tsagalis, Christos. “Placing the Muses: Eumelus fragments 34–35 (West).” CHS Research Bulletin 2, no. 2 (2014). http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:TsagalisC.Placing_the_Muses_Eumelus_Fragments_34-35.2014 §1 After the work of Will (1955) on the Corinthiaca, the editions by Bernabé (1987), Davies (1988), and West (2003), and the studies by West (2002) and Debiasi (2004), it seems that there is a scholarly consensus with respect to the work of Eumelus. Three poems can be safely… Read more

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