Reframing the Phylogeny of Asia Minor Greek: The View from Pontic Greek

An Athenian Decree Revisited

Citation with persistent identifier: Doyen, Charles. “An Athenian Decree Revisited.” CHS Research Bulletin 4, no.1 (2015). http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:DoyenC.An_Athenian_Decree_Revisited.2016 Michel Fourmont’s Collection of Inscriptions 1§1 On September 1, 1728, François Sevin and Michel Fourmont, members of the Académie royale des inscriptions et belles-lettres, left Paris on a scientific journey to Constantinople (Omont 1902:537–662, 1078–1151). They were sent by King Louis XV and his minister, the Count of Maurepas, to collect Greek and oriental manuscripts from… Read more

Spring 2016 Symposium

Join us on Saturday, April 30 for a live webcast of the biannual Center for Hellenic Studies Research Symposium! The stream will be available at http://media.video.harvard.edu/core/live/harvard-chs-live.html. No special software is required. Viewers interested in watching the stream should click on the link above and the stream will play in their web browser. Have questions for the presenters? Contact us via the online form. Saturday, April 30 Session 1, 11:00am-12:30 pm (EDT) “Love Is in the… Read more

A Sanctuary Model for Representing Incubation in Classical Athens

Citation with persistent identifier: Barrenechea, Francisco. “A sanctuary model for representing incubation in Classical Athens.” CHS Research Bulletin 4, no. 1 (2015). http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:BarrenecheaF.A_Sanctuary_Model_for_Representing_Incubation.2016 Introduction 1§1 In December 2016, I had the wonderful opportunity to do a brief presentation of my research to an audience of fellows and colleagues at the Center for Hellenic Studies. This presentation is now available online, and the following lines are meant as a brief introduction to it. The… Read more

Writing and the City in Later Roman Egypt. Towards a Social History of the Ancient “Scribe”

Citation with persistent identifier: Ast, Rodney. “Writing and the City in Later Roman Egypt. Towards a Social History of the Ancient ‘Scribe.’” CHS Research Bulletin 4, no. 1 (2015). http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:AstR.Writing_in_the_City_in_Later_Roman_Egypt.2016 Introduction* 1§1 This paper has its origin in a certain discontent with the one-dimensional way in which ancient writers are often described. The problem is part terminological: the title “scribe,” which properly denotes a professional copyist or clerk, is used very freely in… Read more

Preface to Pindar: Early Classical Choral Songs and the Language of Genre

Citation with persistent identifier: Agócs, Peter. “Preface to Pindar: Early Classical Choral Songs and the Language of Genre.” CHS Research Bulletin 4, no. 1 (2015). http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:AgocsP.Preface_to_Pindar.2016 Introduction 1§1 In the fifth century BCE, ancient Greek society was still a ‘song culture’: “a society whose prime medium for the expression and communication of its most important feelings and ideas” was performed song. To understand the full implications of this fact is, as John Herington… Read more

Abstract–Writing and the City in Late Roman Egypt. Towards a Social History of the Ancient “Scribe”

As part of a larger project on the practical application of literate education in antiquity, this paper highlights one segment of Roman society that dealt in reams of the written word: literate liturgists and members of the curial class. Municipal and state business was conducted by a body of individuals whose ability to write Greek varied. For some, written communication was a routine, albeit secondary, part of the liturgical duties… Read more

Abstract–Reframing the Phylogeny of Asia Minor Greek: The View from Pontic Greek

In this article we discuss some of the crucial issues pertaining to the evolution and classification of Pontic Greek. In particular, we examine the extent to which Pontic Greek participated in the koineization process. In light of the Romeyka data (still spoken in North-East Turkey in the area traditionally known as Pontus), we present our cue-based (in the sense of Lightfoot 2002) reconstruction method (see also Willis 2011), which, according… Read more

Abstract–Preface to Pindar: Early Classical Choral Songs and the Language of Genre

The paper, which argues that Greek philology needs an injection of cultural relativism and attention to indigenous ways of thinking (‘ethnopoetics’), focuses on the problems of genre and cultural distance in reading early Greek poetic texts and especially Pindar and Bacchylides, and on how we can understand what these texts meant in their own time and cultural context. It first examines how the concepts and terms by which Alexandrian scholarship… Read more

Abstract–Palamedes’ Pharmacy

The fate of Palamedes fascinated classical Athens: unjustly accused by Odysseus, he was convicted of treason and executed by the Greek army in Troy. The paper explores this fascination in relation to the catalogues of benefaction that seem to have been a constant in depictions of the story. The catalogues describe Palamedes’ contributions to the war effort and broader collective, and take part in broader discussions of the origins of… Read more

Abstract–A Sanctuary Model for Representing Incubation in Classical Athens

Aristophanes’ comic narrative of a miracle cure of Asklepios in Wealth 627-759 reflects a model for representing this experience that would later manifest itself in the healing stories set up in the god’s sanctuary at Epidauros. In this early instantiation, the model already displays the influence of the sanctuary in the ways it seeks to gives proof that the miracle took place; as an example of this influence, my paper… Read more

Abstract–An Athenian Decree Revisited

This paper focuses on an Athenian decree implementing a fundamental metrological reform at the end of the 2nd century BCE. This text has been known for a long time, since it was seen and copied by Michel Fourmont in Athens in 1729. The inscription is now lost, so that Fourmont’s sketch is our main source for this decree, together with a small fragment of a copy of the same decree… Read more

Fall 2015 Research Symposium

Join us on Saturday, December 5 for a live webcast of the biannual Center for Hellenic Studies Research Symposium! The stream will be available at http://media.video.harvard.edu/core/live/harvard-chs-live.html. No special software is required. Persons interested in watching the stream should click on the link above and the stream will play in their web browser. Have questions for the presenters? Contact us via the online form. Saturday, December 5 Session 1, 2:00-3:30 pm (EST) “Preface to Pindar:… Read more

Connecting People: Mobility and Networks in the Corpus of Greek Private Letters

Citation with persistent identifier: Dana, Madalina. “Connecting People: Mobility and Networks in the Corpus of Greek Private Letters.” CHS Research Bulletin 3, no. 2 (2015). http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:DanaM.Connecting_People.2015 Introduction 1§1 The goal of this article[1] is primarily to highlight the phenomenon of letter writing from the city to its territory, from territory to territory or towards the interior, as an important expression of mobility attested in the extant corpus of private letters.… Read more

Local Pantheons in Motion: Synoecism and Patron Deities in Hellenistic Rhodes

Citation with persistent identifier: Paul, Stéphanie. “Local Pantheons in Motion: Synoecism and Patron Deities in Hellenistic Rhodes.” CHS Research Bulletin 3, no. 2 (2015). http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:PaulS.Local_Pantheons_in_Motion.2015 Ἀκολούθως δὲ τούτοις νομισθῆναι τὴν νῆσον ἱερὰν Ἡλίου καὶ τοὺς μετὰ ταῦτα γενομένους Ῥοδίους διατελέσαι περιττότερον τῶν ἄλλων θεῶν τιμῶντας τὸν Ἥλιον ὡς ἀρχηγὸν τοῦ γένους αὐτῶν. (Diodorus V 56) 1§1 In his account of the early history of Rhodes, Diodorus Siculus relates how the… Read more

Seeing Hera in the Iliad

Citation with persistent identifier: Ali, Seemee. “Seeing Hera in the Iliad.” CHS Research Bulletin 3, no. 2 (2015). http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:AliS.Seeing_Hera_in_the_Iliad.2015 §1 Hera’s name appears early in the Iliad. Well before she herself speaks or even appears in the epic, she acts. Quietly and seemingly imperceptibly, she places an idea directly in Achilles’ phrénes: ἐννῆμαρ μὲν ἀνὰ στρατὸν ᾤχετο κῆλα θεοῖο, τῇ δεκάτῃ δ’ ἀγορὴν δὲ καλέσσατο λαὸν Ἀχιλλεύς· τῷ γὰρ ἐπὶ… Read more

The Social Dynamics of Dedication in the Delian Inventories of the Third Century: Audience, Function and Temporality

Citation with persistent identifier: Constantakopoulou, Christy. “The Social Dynamics of Dedication in the Delian Inventories of the Third Century: Audience, Function and Temporality.” CHS Research Bulletin 3, no. 2 (2015). http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:ConstantakopoulouC.The_Social_Dynamics_of_Dedication.2015 Introduction 1§1 In the year 250 BCE, the hieropoioi, the Delian administrators of the sanctuary, produced an annual inventory, cataloguing the treasures kept in the sanctuary. This inventory is one of the few inventories of the third century that… Read more

Painting, Ethics, and Ontology in Plato’s Republic 5

Citation with persistent identifier: Petraki, Zacharoula. “Painting, Ethics, and Ontology in Plato’s Republic 5.” CHS Research Bulletin 3, no. 2 (2015). http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:PetrakiZ.Painting_Ethics_and_Ontology.2015 1§1 In this paper I examine Plato’s use of the art of painting in the Republic, Book 5, as a metaphor for the integration of citizens in the harmonious society of the ideal city. In the Republic, Plato presents Socrates as a verbal painter who constructs a wide… Read more

Contextualizing Digital Data as Scholarship in Eastern Mediterranean Archaeology

Citation with persistent identifier: Kansa, Eric. “Contextualizing Digital Data as Scholarship in Eastern Mediterranean Archaeology.” CHS Research Bulletin 3, no. 2 (2015). http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:KansaE.Contextualizing_Digital_Data_as_Scholarship.2015 Introduction 1§1 Archaeology is a highly regulated practice. Governments require permits for field work and often provide the majority of the funding for such work. Increasingly, national governments (and supranational entities, such as the European Union) recognize policy interests in the digital documentation that results from archaeological… Read more

Isocrates’ Theory of Goodwill (Eunoia) as a Precursor of Emotional Intelligence

Citation with persistent identifier: Xanthou, Maria G. “Isocrates’ Theory of Goodwill (Eunoia) as a Precursor of Emotional Intelligence.” CHS Research Bulletin 3, no. 2 (2015). http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:XanthouM.Isocrates_Theory_of_Goodwill.2015 Introduction 1§1 The objective of my article is to modify the overarching scheme of Isocratean philosophical and rhetorical pedagogy, conceptualized as logōn paideia, and to combine it with eunoia[1], one of Isocrates’ core educational concepts . My discussion builds on Isocrates’ educational project, which… Read more

The Actors’ Repertoire, Fifth-Century Comedy and Early Tragic Revivals

Citation with persistent identifier: Nervegna, Sebastiana. “The Actors’ Repertoire, Fifth-Century Comedy and Early Tragic Revivals.” CHS Research Bulletin 3, no. 2 (2015). http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:NervegnaS.The_Actors_Repertoire.2015 1§1 In antiquity as today, Greek tragedies circulated both as written texts for the reading public and as scripts for performance on public stages. Of these two strands in the ancient reception of Greek tragedy, textual transmission has received far more attention for at least two main… Read more

To the Dregs: Drawing Meaning from the Rhodian Handles of Hellenistic Ashkelon

Citation with persistent identifier: Birney, Kate. “To the Dregs: Drawing Meaning from the Rhodian Handles of Hellenistic Ashkelon.” CHS Research Bulletin 3, no. 2 (2015). http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:BirneyK.To_the_Dregs.2015 Introduction [1] 1§1 In a second-century letter to Philokrates, Aristeas describes Ashkelon as one of the four major port cities along the Levantine coast, together with Gaza, Jaffa, and (’Akko-) Ptolemais. Because of these ports, he claims, the land lacks nothing in the way of… Read more

Atticist Lexica and the Pronunciation of Greek

Citation with persistent identifier: Vessella, Carlo. “Atticist Lexica and the Pronunciation of Greek.” CHS Research Bulletin 3, no. 1 (2014). http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:VessellaC.Atticist_Lexica_and_the_Pronunciation_of_Greek.2014 Atticism and pronunciation 1§1 This paper argues that some of the Atticist lexica written between the second and third centuries CE contain prescriptions that reveal ideas about the correct pronunciation of Greek among the educated elites of the Imperial period. The same individuals who thought there was a pure variety of Greek… Read more

Abstract–Contextualizing Digital Data as Scholarship in Eastern Mediterranean Archaeology

  Though digital data is assuming increasing importance in archaeological research, it still plays only a minor role in scholarly communications. Most archaeologists do not yet see data sharing as a professional goal; instead, they regard it mainly as a bureaucratic concern. Data need be “managed” (in the parlance of the NSF) to meet the requirements of external funding agencies. In this light, data have more to do with administrative… Read more

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