To the Dregs: Drawing Meaning from the Rhodian Handles of Hellenistic Ashkelon

Abstract–Contextualizing Digital Data as Scholarship in Eastern Mediterranean Archaeology

  Though digital data is assuming increasing importance in archaeological research, it still plays only a minor role in scholarly communications. Most archaeologists do not yet see data sharing as a professional goal; instead, they regard it mainly as a bureaucratic concern. Data need be “managed” (in the parlance of the NSF) to meet the requirements of external funding agencies. In this light, data have more to do with administrative… Read more

Abstract–Local Pantheons in Motion: Synoecism and Patron Deities in Hellenistic Rhodes

This paper addresses some of the limitations of the concept of patron deity through the case-study of the island of Rhodes after the synoecism of 408/7 BC, as well as, in a wider perspective, the impact of historical events on the religious landscape. Focusing on the main cults of Helios, Athena, and Zeus, it will assess how these cults were related, on different levels, to the concerns of political unity… Read more

Abstract–Isocrates’ Theory of Goodwill (Eunoia) as a Precursor of Emotional Intelligence

Εunoia is one of Isocrates’ core paideutic concepts. In my article, I aim to show that if Isocratean philosophical and rhetorical pedagogy is meaningfully modified and combined with eunoia into a nuanced system of Emotional Intelligence (EI), applicable to internal and international politics and public relations, then eunoia emerges as a versatile, multifarious and interactive emotion and concept. In that sense, it comprises a special emotional configuration, resulting from the… Read more

Abstract–Painting, Ethics, and Ontology in Republic 5

In this paper I examine Plato’s use of the art of painting in the Republic, Book 5 as a metaphor for the integration of citizens in the harmonious society of the ideal city. In the Republic, Plato presents Socrates as a verbal painter who constructs a wide and diverse range of verbal images (eikones). The majority of these images are highly colorful, ornate and intricate. Yet, the Socratic images which… Read more

Abstract–The Actors’ Repertoire, Fifth-Century Drama and Early Tragic Revivals

This contribution deals with the theatrical afterlife of Euripides’ Telephus, Aeschylus’Edonians and Libation Bearers. The sources for their ancient reception share two features: (i) Classical dramatists recall the visual aspects of these plays, thus suggesting familiarity with their performance, decades after they premiered; and (ii) these tragedies can be consistently identified in the theatre-related records from the fourth century onwards. This pattern is probably not a coincidence. It suggests that these plays were reperformed around the… Read more

Abstract–Connecting People: Mobility and Networks in the Corpus of Greek Private Letters

The goal of this article is primarily to highlight the phenomenon of the communication trough letter-writing from the city to its territory, from territory to territory or towards the inland regions, as a most important form of mobility in the corpus of Greek private letters. Entrusted to close relations or simply to passing people, who in turn confide it to other acquaintances, the letter travels a distance that its senders… Read more

Abstract–The Social Dynamics of Dedication in the Delian Inventories of the Third Century: Audience, Function and Temporality

My project explores the social dynamics of dedication, as they are reflected in the dedications recorded in the Delian inventories during the third century BC. The Delian practice of annually producing inventories of dedications is quite exceptional. Very few sanctuaries produce regular publication of their inventories; the practice is restricted to Athens and Attica, Delos, and to a lesser extent Didyma. The inventories of Athenian and Attic sanctuaries have attracted… Read more

Abstract–To the Dregs: Drawing Meaning from the Rhodian Handles of Hellenistic Ashkelon

Rhodian amphorae, distinctive for their shape and their rose-stamped handles, are emblematic of specialized wine trade during the Hellenistic period. Their presence in quantity at sites throughout the Mediterranean has been used as a barometer for a city’s financial success and the wealth of its inhabitants, while sudden fluctuations have been correlated with commercial, political or even cultural change. This paper presents a preliminary study of the Rhodian stamped handles… Read more

Abstract–Seeing Hera in the Iliad

Hera is the most under-appreciated deity in the pantheon of Homer’s Iliad. Inseminating mortals with thoughts and understanding the secret plans of Zeus, Hera proves to be a goddess of the mind. Hera’s characteristic sphere of action is the phrénes, the realm of physiological, emotional, and intellectual activity. Hera’s own creative vision enlarges the imaginative scope of the epic – for her noetic mode of seeing brings unity to what is otherwise… Read more

A New Historical Grammar of Demotic Greek: Reflections on the Κοινή Ελληνική in the 19th and 20th Centuries as Seen through Thumb’s Handbook of…

Citation with persistent identifier: Janse, Mark, & Joseph, Brian. “A New Historical Grammar of Demotic Greek: Reflections on the Κοινή Ελληνική in the 19th and 20th Centuries as Seen through Thumb’s Handbook of the Modern Greek Vernacular.” CHS Research Bulletin 2, no. 2 (2014). http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:Janse_Joseph.What_Thumbs_Handbook_Tells_Us.2014 Introduction 1§1 In 1895, the German Hellenist, Sanskritist, Indo-Europeanist, and general historical linguist Albert Thumb (1865–1915), known also for his more classically oriented scholarship both in… Read more

Trojan War by Homer: Retaliation, Narrative Order, and Cretan Focus

Citation with persistent identifier: Zecchin de Fasano, Graciela. “Trojan War by Homer: Retaliation, Narrative Order, and Cretan Focus.” CHS Research Bulletin 2, no. 2 (2014). http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:ZecchindeFasanoG.Trojan_War_by_Homer_Retaliation_Narrative_Order.2014 Introduction* 1§1 The retaliation war (Trojan War), the internal war of a genos for power and heritage (Theban War), the war for identity (Persian Wars), and finally, the war for the hegemony of one city (Peloponnesian War) were all painful, usual phenomena in the life of Ancient Greece.… Read more

Reclining with Callinus and Tyrtaeus: Martial Elegy in the Symposion

Citation with persistent identifier: Cazzato, Vanessa. “Reclining with Callinus and Tyrtaeus: Martial Elegy in the Symposion.” CHS Research Bulletin 2, no. 2 (2014). http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:CazzatoV.Reclining_with_Callinus_and_Tyrtaeus.2014 §1 That martial elegy, like all shorter elegy, belonged to (some form of) the symposion has become a matter of scholarly orthodoxy since Ewen Bowie formulated his powerful arguments to this effect almost thirty years ago.[1][2]  More recently, Elizabeth Irwin has offered a thorough analysis of… Read more

Placing the Muses: Eumelus fragments 34–35 (West)*

Citation with persistent identifier: Tsagalis, Christos. “Placing the Muses: Eumelus fragments 34–35 (West).” CHS Research Bulletin 2, no. 2 (2014). http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:TsagalisC.Placing_the_Muses_Eumelus_Fragments_34-35.2014 §1 After the work of Will (1955) on the Corinthiaca, the editions by Bernabé (1987), Davies (1988), and West (2003), and the studies by West (2002) and Debiasi (2004), it seems that there is a scholarly consensus with respect to the work of Eumelus. Three poems can be safely… Read more

Hellenistic Information in China

Citation with persistent identifier: Yang, Juping. “Hellenistic Information in China.” CHS Research Bulletin 2, no. 2 (2014). http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:YangJ.Hellenistic_Information_in_China.2014 Introduction 1§1 This paper is one of the series of research results for my program “Hellenistic Civilization and the Silk Road.”[1] 1§2 Hellenistic Civilization originated and developed in a new world established by Alexander the Great and his successors and was the result of mutual contacts, exchanges, and fusion between Greek and other eastern… Read more

The Tyrant’s Network: Appearances of Characters in the Letters of Phalaris

Citation with persistent identifier: Marquis, Emeline. “The Tyrant’s Network:  Appearances of Characters in the Letters of Phalaris.” CHS Research Bulletin 2, no. 2 (2014). http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:MarquisE.The_Tyrants_Network_Appearances_of_Characters.2014 1§1 The letters of Phalaris are a fascinating object, both for their content and for their history. This epistolary fiction contains 148 letters attributed to Phalaris, the historical tyrant of sixth-century Sicily, who became a mythical figure and the archetype of a cruel ruler; the letters are all written… Read more

Plato and Xenophon on Friendship. A Comparative Study (Plato Lysis and Xenophon Conversations of Socrates 2.6)*

Citation with persistent identifier: Tamiolaki, Melina. “Plato and Xenophon on Friendship. A Comparative Study (Plato Lysis and Xenophon Conversations of Socrates 2.6)”. CHS Research Bulletin 2, no. 2 (2014). http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:TamiolakiM.Plato_and_Xenophon_on_Friendship_a_Comparative_Study.2014 …if Xenophon’s understanding of Socrates is correct, I believe that in sophisticated, inquisitive Athens people would rather have Socrates done away with because he bored them than because they feared him. S. Kierkegaard. 1841. The Concept of Irony with Continual… Read more

Khronos, Cronos, and the Cronion Hill: The Spatialization of Time in Pindar’s Olympian 10

Citation with persistent identifier: Pavlou, Maria. “Khronos, Cronos, and the Cronion Hill: The Spatialization of Time in Pindar’s Olympian 10.” CHS Research Bulletin 2, no. 2 (2014). http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:PavlouM.Chronos_Kronos_and_the_Kronion_Hill.2014 The mountain sat upon the plain In his eternal chair, His observation omnifold, His inquest everywhere. The seasons prayed around his knees, Like children round a sire: Grandfather of the days is he, Of dawn the ancestor. E. Dickinson, ‘The Mountain’  … Read more

Prevention or Cure? Tax Exemptions in a Warfare Context: Miletus and the Low Valley of the Maeander (early second century BCE)

Citation with persistent identifier: Carrara, Aurélie.”Prevention or Cure? Tax Exemptions in a Warfare Context: Miletus and the Low Valley of the Maeander (early second century BCE).” CHS Research Bulletin 2, no. 2 (2014). http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:CarraraA:Prevention_or_Cure_Tax_Exemptions.2014 1§1 Taxation in ancient Greece had various purposes. The easiest to identify is the acquisition of the revenue needed to pay for the public expenditures. Taxation was also used to meet other specific needs of the… Read more

Οὐ τὸ νικᾶν ἀλλὰ τὸ εὖ ἀγωνίζεσθαι: Playing to win or to show off? Itinerant artists performing in unconventional ἀγῶνες in some decrees from…

Citation with persistent identifier: Cinalli, Angela. “Οὐ τὸ νικᾶν ἀλλὰ τὸ εὖ ἀγωνίζεσθαι: Playing to win or to show off? Itinerant artists performing in unconventional ἀγῶνες in some decrees from Delphi (third to first century BC).” CHS Research Bulletin 2, no. 2 (2014). http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:CinalliA.Playing_to_Win_or_to_Show_Off.2014 §1 In the cultural panorama of the Hellenistic Period, a significant space is occupied by itinerant professionals of literature and music who travelled from city to… Read more

Leisure Rules in Archaic Greece: Legislation on Inebriation and Foul Play in Literary and Epigraphic Sources

Citation with persistent identifier: Martín González, Elena. “Leisure Rules in Archaic Greece: Legislation on Inebriation and Foul Play in Literary and Epigraphic Sources.” CHS Research Bulletin 2, no. 2 (2014). http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:MartinGonzalezE.Leisure_Rules_in_Archaic_Greece.2014 1§1 Communal wine-drinking and athletic competition are the quintessential leisure activities in the Archaic Greek society. In the Homeric poems, the aristocratic elite is portrayed enjoying wine during feasts, an activity that enhances camaraderie and reinforces boundaries within the… Read more

The City at the Theater in Anatolia from the 260s to the 320s AD: Signs of a Major Transformation

Citation with persistent identifier: Pont, Anne-Valérie. “The City at the Theater in Anatolia from the 260s to the 320s AD: Signs of a Major Transformation.” CHS Research Bulletin 2, no. 2 (2014). http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:PontAV.The_City_at_the_Theater_in_Anatolia_from_the_260s.2014 Introduction 1§1 The “theater” is, by definition and etymology, the scene of the performance, the place for looking at something.  From the Greek classical world up to the civic societies of the Greek part of the Roman Empire,… Read more

Abstract–The City at the Theater in Anatolia from the 260s to the 320s AD: Signs of a Major Transformation

Life in the cities of Asia Minor between the 260s and the 320s is rarely studied: there is a bibliographical gap for the period between High Empire and Late Antiquity. Different sources, of an epigraphic, literary, juridical, hagiographic or patristic nature, nevertheless allow for the analysis of the modes of community life on a local scale and of its new dynamics. The uses of the theater and the collective emotions… Read more

Early Reperformances of Drama in the Fifth Century

Citation with persistent identifier: Lamari, Anna. “Early Reperformances of Drama in the Fifth Century.” CHS Research Bulletin 2, no. 2 (2014). http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:LamariA.Early_reperformances_of_drama_in_the_fifth_century.2014 Introduction 1§1 When we think of the three classical tragedians we usually picture them as writing, directing, or even performing their own plays, not as supervising the re-performances of their own work. The beginning of reperformances of drama is traditionally placed in 387/6 BC for tragedies and in 340/39… Read more

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