Democracy and Civic Participation in Greek Cities Under Roman Imperial Rule: Political…

Prodicus on the Rise of Civilization: Religion, Agriculture, and Culture Heroes

Citation with persistent identifier: Kouloumentas, Stavros. “Prodicus on the rise of civilization: religion, agriculture, and culture heroes.” CHS Research Bulletin 4, no. 2 (2016). http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:KouloumentasS.Prodicus_on_the_Rise_of_Civilization.2016 1§1 Three authors who were active in classical Athens seem to have been familiar with Prodicus’ doctrines.[1] Xenophon preserves a speech of Prodicus in which the young Heracles meets Virtue and Vice, two ladies of entirely different appearance and character who in turn make cases for living… Read more

Anaxagoras, Socrates, and the History of “Philosophy”

Citation with persistent identifier: Moore, Christopher. “Anaxagoras, Socrates, and the history of “philosophy.” CHS Research Bulletin 4, no. 2 (2016). http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:MooreC.Anaxagoras_Socrates_and_the_History_of_Philosophy.2016 The tenuous grip of a name 1§1 In all of extant fifth-century Greek literature, authors use the terms philosophos, philosopheô, and philosophia half a dozen times.[1] Those uses serve as so many camerae obscurae onto Greek intellectual history. Squeezing through those lexical pinpricks are dense and brilliant tableaux of investigations, debates, and… Read more

Love is in the Hands: Affective Relationships with Objects in Votive Dedications [1]

Citation with persistent identifier: Noel, Anne-Sophie. “Love is in the hands: Affective relationships with objects in votive dedications.” CHS Research Bulletin 4, no. 2 (2016). http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:NoelA.Affective_Relationships_with_Objects.2016 §1 In Cast Away[2], Robert Zemeckis staged an unforgettable actor pair, made of the world-renowned actor Tom Hanks and a certain Wilson, which happens not to be a man, but a volleyball. The film narrates how Chuck Noland, a FedEx employee, survives an airplane crash in the… Read more

A Short Introduction to the Seleucid Era

Citation with persistent identifier: Kosmin, Paul J. “A Short Introduction to the Seleucid Era.” CHS Research Bulletin 4, no. 2 (2016). http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:KosminP.Introduction_to_the_Seleucid_Era.2016 1§1 This brief paper is intended to supply background information for my presentation at the Research Symposium on Saturday, 30th April. The oral presentation will discuss the invention of the Seleucid Era dating count and its employment in one significant sphere of social and political life in the Seleucid Levant ­­­—… Read more

What’s in a Name? Linguistic Considerations in the Study of ‘Karian’ Religion

Citation with persistent identifier: Carless Unwin, Naomi. “What’s in a name? Linguistic considerations in the study of  ‘Karian’ religion.” CHS Research Bulletin 4, no. 2 (2016). http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:CarlessUnwinN.Linguistic_Considerations.2016 1§1 The history of Karia is entangled with that of the Greek-speaking world; the cultural and religious character of the region was shaped by sustained interaction with both east and west.[1] Ionian and Dorian settlements were established along the Anatolian seaboard from the tenth century BCE… Read more

Spike Lee’s Didactic Lens of Aristophanes [1]

Citation with persistent identifier: Stark, Caroline. “Spike Lee’s Didactic Lens of Aristophanes.” CHS Research Bulletin 4, no. 2 (2016). http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:StarkC.Spike_Lees_Didactic_Lens_of_Aristophanes.2016 This paper is a counterpart to the paper, “Lysistrata(s): Aristophanes to Spike Lee,” and a sample from a module of the forthcoming Io Project, an online resource for Classics in Africa and the African Diaspora. 1§1 Spike Lee’s film Chi-Raq (2015), co-written with Kevin Willmott, reimagines Aristophanes’ Lysistrata to address gang-related gun… Read more

Abstract | Love Is in the Hands: Looking for Traces of Affective Relationship Between Human and Object in Votive Epigrams

This paper comprises two parts. The first section will give an insight into my global project on “feelings for objects in ancient Greece”, by bringing together two inanimate objects that arouse strong feelings of empathy and affection: the first one comes from a Hollywood movie (Wilson, the volleyball in Cast Away, by R. Zemeckis), the second one from a Greek tragedy (the bow of Philoctetes, in the play by Sophocles… Read more

Abstract | The Anaxagorean-Socratic Moment in the History of the Philosophos

The half-dozen fifth-century attestations to the word philosophos (and its cognates), from Eastern and Western Greece, do not promise the term’s longevity. But it did live on, crystallizing in Athens the discipline called philosophia around it. I argue for a late-fifth century conduit for the name’s preservation and success. Anaxagoras and his associates appear to have been called philosophoi by their Athenian contemporaries, probably for their intellectual and practical affinity… Read more

Abstract | Lysistrata(s): Aristophanes to Spike Lee

Modern reworkings of ancient drama offer a valuable interpretative and didactic lens through which scholars can re-examine issues and themes of ancient plays. This paper analyzes some correspondences and divergences between Aristophanes’ Lysistrata and Spike Lee’s film Chi-Raq (2015) to demonstrate that not only does Lee’s film make the ancient world relevant by re-envisioning Aristophanes’ play for modern audiences, but it also draws attention to issues inherent in the play… Read more

Abstract | Prodicus on the Rise of Civilization: Agriculture, Religion and Culture Heroes

Prodicus gained a reputation for formulating a novel theory concerning the origins of religious belief. He suggests that humans initially regarded as gods things that were useful for their survival such as fruits and rivers, and in a more advanced stage they deified culture heroes such as Demeter and Dionysus. I suggest that Prodicus’ theory can be connected with other doctrines attributed to him, especially the speech concerning “Heracles’ choice” and the keen interest… Read more

Abstract | What’s in a Name? Linguistic Considerations in the study of ‘Karian’ religion

The study of religion in Karia, in south western Anatolia, is inextricably linked with the wider social dynamics of the region; the cultural and religious character of the region was shaped by sustained interaction with both east and west. My intention in this paper is to reconsider the framework in which discussions of religion in Karia are frequently embedded, and address the methodological issues that need to be considered when… Read more

Abstract | Two Thousand Years of Scholarly Apps

This paper first looks at how ancient scholars exploited the technology of writing to add functions — or, in more contemporary term, “apps” — to otherwise linear texts. Examples, with special emphasis on manuscript evidence, from fields as remote as astronomy, geography, chronology and grammar suggest that modern distinctions of “literary” and “scientific” scholarship can mask important practices, language and habits of thought shared across these scholarly domains. In the… Read more

Abstract | The New Order of Time and Cult in Synoecized Poleis

In 408/7 BC, the old Rhodian cities of Ialysus, Camirus, and Lindus united to form one polis and create a joint capital called Rhodes at the northern tip of the island. Cos, Cnidus, and other democratic or oligarchic cities followed their example more or less successfully in the course of the 4th century. They gave up their independence in favor of a superior and more distant sovereignty, sent out citizens… Read more

Abstract | Democracy and Civic Participation in Greek Cities under Roman Imperial Rule: Political Practice and Culture in the Post-Classical Period

It has been assumed in scholarship for a long time that democracy was characteristic of 5th-century BCE Athens and that this kind of political regime did not survive the rise of Macedonian hegemony in the late 4th century BCE. In recent years, however, many studies have shown that democratic institutions were still to be found in Greek cities in the Hellenistic period. Yet, what was the situation during the Roman… Read more

Connecting People: Mobility and Networks in the Corpus of Greek Private Letters

Citation with persistent identifier: Dana, Madalina. “Connecting People: Mobility and Networks in the Corpus of Greek Private Letters.” CHS Research Bulletin 3, no. 2 (2015). http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:DanaM.Connecting_People.2015 Introduction 1§1 The goal of this article[1] is primarily to highlight the phenomenon of letter writing from the city to its territory, from territory to territory or towards the interior, as an important expression of mobility attested in the extant corpus of private letters.… Read more

Local Pantheons in Motion: Synoecism and Patron Deities in Hellenistic Rhodes

Citation with persistent identifier: Paul, Stéphanie. “Local Pantheons in Motion: Synoecism and Patron Deities in Hellenistic Rhodes.” CHS Research Bulletin 3, no. 2 (2015). http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:PaulS.Local_Pantheons_in_Motion.2015 Ἀκολούθως δὲ τούτοις νομισθῆναι τὴν νῆσον ἱερὰν Ἡλίου καὶ τοὺς μετὰ ταῦτα γενομένους Ῥοδίους διατελέσαι περιττότερον τῶν ἄλλων θεῶν τιμῶντας τὸν Ἥλιον ὡς ἀρχηγὸν τοῦ γένους αὐτῶν. (Diodorus V 56) 1§1 In his account of the early history of Rhodes, Diodorus Siculus relates how the… Read more

Seeing Hera in the Iliad

Citation with persistent identifier: Ali, Seemee. “Seeing Hera in the Iliad.” CHS Research Bulletin 3, no. 2 (2015). http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:AliS.Seeing_Hera_in_the_Iliad.2015 §1 Hera’s name appears early in the Iliad. Well before she herself speaks or even appears in the epic, she acts. Quietly and seemingly imperceptibly, she places an idea directly in Achilles’ phrénes: ἐννῆμαρ μὲν ἀνὰ στρατὸν ᾤχετο κῆλα θεοῖο, τῇ δεκάτῃ δ’ ἀγορὴν δὲ καλέσσατο λαὸν Ἀχιλλεύς· τῷ γὰρ ἐπὶ… Read more

The Social Dynamics of Dedication in the Delian Inventories of the Third Century: Audience, Function and Temporality

Citation with persistent identifier: Constantakopoulou, Christy. “The Social Dynamics of Dedication in the Delian Inventories of the Third Century: Audience, Function and Temporality.” CHS Research Bulletin 3, no. 2 (2015). http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:ConstantakopoulouC.The_Social_Dynamics_of_Dedication.2015 Introduction 1§1 In the year 250 BCE, the hieropoioi, the Delian administrators of the sanctuary, produced an annual inventory, cataloguing the treasures kept in the sanctuary. This inventory is one of the few inventories of the third century that… Read more

Painting, Ethics, and Ontology in Plato’s Republic 5

Citation with persistent identifier: Petraki, Zacharoula. “Painting, Ethics, and Ontology in Plato’s Republic 5.” CHS Research Bulletin 3, no. 2 (2015). http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:PetrakiZ.Painting_Ethics_and_Ontology.2015 1§1 In this paper I examine Plato’s use of the art of painting in the Republic, Book 5, as a metaphor for the integration of citizens in the harmonious society of the ideal city. In the Republic, Plato presents Socrates as a verbal painter who constructs a wide… Read more

Contextualizing Digital Data as Scholarship in Eastern Mediterranean Archaeology

Citation with persistent identifier: Kansa, Eric. “Contextualizing Digital Data as Scholarship in Eastern Mediterranean Archaeology.” CHS Research Bulletin 3, no. 2 (2015). http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:KansaE.Contextualizing_Digital_Data_as_Scholarship.2015 Introduction 1§1 Archaeology is a highly regulated practice. Governments require permits for field work and often provide the majority of the funding for such work. Increasingly, national governments (and supranational entities, such as the European Union) recognize policy interests in the digital documentation that results from archaeological… Read more

Isocrates’ Theory of Goodwill (Eunoia) as a Precursor of Emotional Intelligence

Citation with persistent identifier: Xanthou, Maria G. “Isocrates’ Theory of Goodwill (Eunoia) as a Precursor of Emotional Intelligence.” CHS Research Bulletin 3, no. 2 (2015). http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:XanthouM.Isocrates_Theory_of_Goodwill.2015 Introduction 1§1 The objective of my article is to modify the overarching scheme of Isocratean philosophical and rhetorical pedagogy, conceptualized as logōn paideia, and to combine it with eunoia[1], one of Isocrates’ core educational concepts . My discussion builds on Isocrates’ educational project, which… Read more

The Actors’ Repertoire, Fifth-Century Comedy and Early Tragic Revivals

Citation with persistent identifier: Nervegna, Sebastiana. “The Actors’ Repertoire, Fifth-Century Comedy and Early Tragic Revivals.” CHS Research Bulletin 3, no. 2 (2015). http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:NervegnaS.The_Actors_Repertoire.2015 1§1 In antiquity as today, Greek tragedies circulated both as written texts for the reading public and as scripts for performance on public stages. Of these two strands in the ancient reception of Greek tragedy, textual transmission has received far more attention for at least two main… Read more

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