Poetic Authority and the Utility of Reproduction in Hesiod’s Theogony and Works…

Silence and Rumor as Rhetorical Strategies in Basil’s Letters

Citation with persistent identifier: Fowler, Ryan, and Quiroga-Puertas, Alberto. “Silence and Rumor as Rhetorical Strategies in Basil’s Letters.” CHS Research Bulletin 3, no. 1 (2014). http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:FowlerR_and_PuertasA.Silence_and_Rumor_as_Rhetorical_Strategies.2014 §1 In this paper, we analyze the relationship between silence and rumor in the letters of Basil of Caesarea (329 or 330-379 CE), one of the Cappadocian Fathers and a towering figure in the intellectual and religious milieu of the fourth century AD. Basil wrote in a… Read more

Minoan Communities and Commemorative Practices: The Late Prepalatial to Protopalatial Tholos Tomb A at Apesokari/Crete

Citation with persistent identifier: Flouda, Georgia. “Minoan Communities and Commemorative Practices: The Late Prepalatial to Protopalatial Tholos Tomb A at Apesokari/Crete.” CHS Research Bulletin 3, no. 1 (2014). http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:FloudaG.Minoan_Communities_and_Commemorative_Practices.2014 1§1 Charged with emotional content, the burial of the deceased is cross-culturally one of the social events that create the most powerful associations. Ancestor commemoration goes one step further, as it involves practices relating to the formation and maintenance of shared memories… Read more

A Stroll along the Sea: The Processional Way in Ephesus and the Littoral

Citation with persistent identifier: Feuser, Stefan. “A Stroll along the Sea: The Processional Way in Ephesus and the Littoral.” CHS Research Bulletin 3, no. 1 (2014). http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:FeuserS.A_Stroll_along_the_Sea.2014 1§1 Port cities played an essential role in the history of the ancient Mediterranean[1]. Due to their location they were the transition point for traffic between land and sea. It was here where the stream of goods, people and ideas was constricted. The geographer… Read more

Abstract–Poetic Authority and the Utility of Reproduction in the Theogony and Works and Days

This paper examines the rhetorical function of reproduction in the Theogony and the Works and Days. It is grounded in the dual observation that, while there is a great deal of overlap in the poems’ dominant attitudes about women and childbirth, 1) both poems engage with strains of a far more complicated discourse about the nature of reproduction and its role in shaping men’s lives, and 2) both selectively activate… Read more

Abstract–Silence and Rumor as Rhetorical Strategies in Basil's Letters

In this project we have analyzed the use of two non-technical communication strategies—rumor and silence—in the epistles of Basil of Caeserea. We have approached silence as Basil’s method to manage his self-image and his engagement with the theological landscape of the fourth century, and rumor as narrative strategy to alter the reputation of an enemy or to manipulate it for their own benefit. In effect, our study shows that rumor… Read more

Abstract–The Control of Emotion: Rhetorical Education and Civic Oratory in the Greco-Roman East

This paper focuses on the early stages of ancient rhetorical education, as a foundation for exploring the emotions involved in the composition and reception of ancient speeches in the Greek East of the Roman Empire in the early centuries AD. It concentrates on the progymnasmata, preliminary exercises in rhetorical composition, as evidenced by manuals, sample ‘fair copies’ of such exercises and school exercises on papyrus from Egypt. These sources are read as fragments… Read more

Abstract–Minoan Communities and Commemorative Practices: the Late Prepalatial to Protopalatial Tholos Tomb A at Apesokari/Crete

The presentation examines the communal Tholos Tomb A at Apesokari in south-central Crete as the diachronic locus of the commemorative practices employed by one of the kinship groups of the community inhabiting the nearby habitation site on Vigla hill. The commemorative practices are reconstructed through the layout and the burial assemblage of the tomb as a continuum of multi-staged mortuary rituals; these extend from the inhumation of the corpse to… Read more

Abstract–Atticist lexica and the pronunciation of Greek

It can be proven that Atticist lexica contain information on a special pronunciation of Greek, which the Atticists aimed at achieving as part of their training. The paper illustrates the ways in which the lexica point their readers to this pronunciation, and examines some glosses that witness ‘hyperatticising pronunciations’, some of which may even have been inadvertently adopted by the lexicographers themselves. Read more

Abstract–A stroll along the sea: The processional way in Ephesus and the littoral

Port cities played an essential role in the history of the ancient Mediterranean. Due to their location they were the transition point for traffic between land and sea. However, we are far away from understanding the spatial, functional, economic as well as social and cultural relevance of ancient port cities. With this paper concentrated on the city of Ephesus – located on the western shore of Asia Minor – I… Read more

Using Homer for Divination: Homeromanteia in Context

Martín-Hernández, Raquel. “Using Homer for Divination: Homeromanteia in Context.” CHS Research Bulletin 2, no. 1 (2013). http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:MartinHernandezR.Using_Homer_for_Divination_Homeromanteia_in_Context.2013 Aim   §1  Much has been said about the uses and abuses of the Homeric texts; about whom their users were, how they were used, why, when, how, and where they were performed, and who the audience of the Iliad and the Odyssey was in Classical and Roman times, among other questions. From the use of Homer’s works… Read more

Perceptions of the Barbarian in Early Greece and China

Citation with persistent identifier: Huang, Yang. “Perceptions of the Barbarian in Early Greece and China.” CHS Research Bulletin 2, no. 1 (2013). http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:HuangY.Perceptions_of_the_Barbarian_in_Early_Greece_and_China.2013 §1  Questions of Greek ethnic identity and Greek perceptions of the barbarian continue to stimulate inspiring studies some of which have contended what can be called orthodox theories or models by adopting new perspectives and making use of materials not drawn into the discussions previously. Erich Gruen, for example, argues… Read more

The Establishment of the City-States of Eastern Crete from the Archaic to the Roman Period

Citation with persistent identifier: Coutsinas, Nadia. “The Establishment of the City-States of Eastern Crete from the Archaic to the Roman Period.” CHS Research Bulletin 2, no. 1 (2013). http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:CoutsinasN.The_Establishment_of_the_City-States_of_Eastern_Crete.2013 §1  The island of Crete is both the southernmost and the largest island in Greece. So, unlike the other Greek islands, it was home to dozens of cities, which all had to contend for enough land to survive. Inevitably, the urban centers fought… Read more

Aristotle’s Treatment of Force and Compulsion as Exculpatory Conditions for Moral Responsibility

Citation with persistent identifier: Lienemann, Béatrice. “Aristotle’s Treatment of Force and Compulsion as Exculpatory Conditions for Moral Responsibility.” CHS Research Bulletin 2, no. 1 (2013). http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:LienemannB.Aristotles_Treatment_of_Force_and_Compulsion.2013 §1  From history and the news, we are all familiar with difficult situations such as the following: the politician who has to decide whether or not to torture a terrorist to make him reveal where his group has planted the bomb which threatens to kill innocent… Read more

Socrates in the Marketplace

Citation with persistent identifier: Collins, James. “Socrates in the Marketplace.” CHS Research Bulletin 2, no. 1 (2013). http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:CollinsJ.Socrates_in_the_Market_Place.2013 §1  This paper is part of a larger project on the ways in which professional philosophers of fourth-century Athens compete with other occupations and lifestyles. I am trying to determine the broader pragmatics of a ‘marketplace of ideas’ in the larger context of traditional and competing systems of social and economic exchange.… Read more

The Lord of the Wings: Political Leadership and the Rhetorical Manipulation of Athenian Law in Aristophanes’ Birds

Citation with persistent identifier: Buis, Emiliano J. “The Lord of the Wings:  Political Leadership and the Rhetorical Manipulation of Athenian Law in Aristophanes’ Birds.” CHS Research Bulletin 2, no. 1 (2013). http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:BuisE.The_Lord_of_the_Wings.2013 Introduction §1  The importance of law in Old Comedy is reflected by the numerous legal terms mentioned in Aristophanes’ plays,[1] but there have rarely been literary interpretations of comedies that take into account the juridical phraseology and imagery as a… Read more

Abstract–Socrates in the Marketplace

Why does Socrates frequent, and often use the language of, the marketplace? Why, when so many of his elite interlocutors vehemently express disgust for craftsmen and merchants, does Socrates feature them and their products in his arguments? Elites express tremendous anxiety about the banausic nature of workers and their corrupting influence in politics. And Socrates himself is sometimes represented and understood as an oligarchic elitist who shares in contempt for… Read more

Abstract–Perceptions of the Barbarian in Ancient Greece and China

The ancient Greeks and Chinese bear striking similarities in their attitudes towards other peoples, often calling them ‘barbarians’. This paper attempts to discuss Greek and Chinese perceptions of the barbarian in a comparative perspective in the hope that such a study might be helpful for further understanding the role that such perceptions played in the self-identification of both societies. The paper at first outlines Chinese attitudes towards other peoples from… Read more

Abstract–The Lord of the Wings: Political Leadership and the Rhetorical Manipulation of Athenian Law in Aristophanes' Birds

 In Aristophanes’ comedy Birds (414 BCE), the protagonist Peisetaerus —not surprisingly named as “he who persuades his companions”— becomes an outstanding master of rhetoric, who smoothly manages to use his λόγος to convince birds, gods and mortals about his own ruling primacy. However, this triumph is not only achieved by the mere power of language, but can be explained more especially as the result of a well-thought legal manipulation. A… Read more

Abstract–Aristotle’s Treatment of Force and Compulsion as Exculpatory Conditions for Moral Responsibility

This paper explores Aristotle’s conception of responsibility in the Eudemian Ethics and the Nicomachean Ethics by focusing on one representative example:  his treatment of force and compulsion as exculpatory conditions. This case is revealing both for Aristotle’s specific views on the appropriate reactions to actions undertaken under conditions of force or compulsion and for his methodological approach to demanding questions on moral responsibility. Starting with Aristotle’s determination of clear cases… Read more

Abstract–The Establishment of the City-States of Eastern Crete from the Archaic to the Roman Period

The island of Crete is the largest Greek island. Unlike the others, it contains dozens of cities, all of which have had to share the island to survive. The mountains occupy more than half of the island, while the fertile plains are very limited, mostly situated on the coasts (with the exception of the Messara plain, the biggest of the island). As a result, the landscape of Crete is highly… Read more

Abstract–The Second Loss of Troy: Some Thoughts about Strabo, Book 13

 Troy and Troas have always been a central issue for ancient and modern scholars dealing with Hellenic and Roman identities and cultural history. Despite the huge interest for the city destroyed by the Achaeans, the site of Troy was rediscovered only in the 1870s by Heinrich Schliemann. The long history of the search for Troy, however, began already in Antiquity, at the precise moment when the heritage of Ilion was… Read more

Abstract–Using Homer for Divination. Homeromanteia in Context

The verses of Homer were often interpreted in Antiquity as the voice of an oracle. But we have no material evidence about the use of Homeric verses as oracles before the third and fourth centuries CE. This paper is focused on the use of Homeric works in divination in Roman times and consists in a comparative study of the three Homeromanteia that have been preserved. A comparison of the content and the… Read more

The Image and the Text: Dedicatory Epigrams and Strategies of Communication in Archaic and Classical Athens

Citation with persistent identifier: Kaczko, Sara. “The Image and the Text: Dedicatory Epigrams on Stone and Strategies of Communication in Archaic and Classical Athens.” CHS Research Bulletin 1, no. 1 (2012). http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:KaczkoS.The_Image_and_the_Text_Dedicatory_Epigrams.2012 Per Roberta Introduction[1] §1  To the eyes of a Greek citizen of Archaic and Classical times, inscribed epigrams were an ordinary sight; to the eyes of a modern scholar, they possibly offer a unique opportunity. This is because… Read more

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