The Shrine of the Valley of the Muses: An Archaeological, Historical and…

Silver Cups from Cyrene: Between Royal Gifts and Numismatic Implications

Citation with persistent identifier: Rosamilia, Emilio. “Silver Cups from Cyrene: Between Royal Gifts and Numismatic Implications.” CHS Research Bulletin 8 (2020). http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:RosamiliaE.Silver_Cups_from_Cyrene.2020 Ancient Greek vessels made out of precious metals are one of the most striking products of ancient craftsmanship. With their lavish decoration and elegant lines, gold and silver vessels have long been considered symbols of the luxuries among which members of ancient elites spent their lives. As such, they have become… Read more

Local Scripts in Archaic Macedonia

Citation with persistent identifier: Boufalis, Angelos. “Local Scripts in Archaic Macedonia.” CHS Research Bulletin 7 (2019). http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:BoufalisA.Local_Scripts_in_Archaic_Macedonia.2019 Up to the end of the fifth century BCE, when the Ionic alphabet was adopted by all Greeks as the common script, the Greek city-states used distinct local scripts, each one setting up its own local variation, produced either by re-designing the original forms or by inventing new, unique and distinctive ones. As Nino Luraghi (2010) has… Read more

A New Corpus of Greek and Latin Inscriptions from the Kaystros River Valley in Southern Lydia

Citation with persistent identifier: Ricl, Marijana. “A New Corpus of Greek and Latin Inscriptions from the Kaystros River Valley in Southern Lydia.” CHS Research Bulletin 7 (2019). http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:RiclM.A_New_Corpus_of_Greek_and_Latin_Inscriptions_from_the_Kaystros_River_Valley.2019 Abstract The work on a corpus of new Greek and Latin inscriptions from the Kaystros River valley commenced prior to the arrival at the Center for Hellenic Studies. During the eight weeks awarded to the editor by the CHS, about two thirds of the… Read more

The Eagle and the Owl: Athenian Legacies in Early Ptolemaic Alexandria

Citation with persistent identifier: Amendola, Davide. “The Eagle and the Owl: Athenian Legacies in Early Ptolemaic Alexandria.” CHS Research Bulletin 7 (2019). http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:AmendolaD.The_Eagle_and_the_Owl.2019 Abstract The reception of the Athenian model and its impact throughout the Hellenistic world and beyond have increasingly become the focus of recent scholarship. My project proposes to carry out a thorough reconsideration of the history of Ptolemaic Egypt through a close examination of political and ideological reuses of… Read more

Citizens and Foreigners in Archaic Greece: Access to Land, Justice and Cults

Persistent identifier: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:Pinol-VillanuevaA.Citizens_and_Foreigners_in_Archaic_Greece.2018 Abstract Escaping from the narrow Aristotelian definition of ‘citizenship’ based on the taking of political office, I investigate how throughout Greek Antiquity, and especially during the Archaic period, the threshold between the status of ‘citizen’ and that of ‘foreigner’ seems to have lain in the degree of recognition of certain rights in the economic, juridical and cultic fields, namely the right to own real estate, the right to… Read more

Inscribing Temples in Greece and Asia Minor: A Diachronic View

Persistent identifier: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:SitzA.Inscribing_Temples_in_Greece_and_Asia_Minor.2018 Abstract My research centers on new approaches to epigraphic material, highlighting their physical characteristics and architectural contexts in addition to the texts themselves. My current project focuses on inscriptions written on Greek and Roman temples in Turkey and Greece in order to analyze the spatial settings of these documents and the role that they played in defining ancient sanctuaries and religious experience more broadly. I also draw attention… Read more

Social identity, social meaning, and the dynamics of everyday writing in Roman and Late Antique Egypt

Persistent identifier: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:BenteinK.Social_Identity_Social_Meaning_and_the_Dynamics_of_Everyday_Writing.2018 Abstract Recent studies of Ancient Greek have drawn attention to the social significance of linguistic choice. So far, however, surprisingly little attention has been paid to non-literary evidence: in the dry sands of Egypt, tens of thousands of ‘documentary’ texts have been preserved, ranging from scrap papers and shopping lists to marriage contracts and imperial edicts, which await further study. In this paper, I briefly introduce a research… Read more

Διονύσιος: Τhe grammarian, the potter and the ghosts*

Citation with persistent identifier: Nasioula, Maria. Διονύσιος: Τhe grammarian, the potter and the ghosts. CHS Research Bulletin 5, no. 2 (2017). http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:NasioulaM.Dionysios.2017 τοιοῦτον εἴδομεν ποτήριον γραμματικὸν ἀνακείμενον ἐν Καπύῃ τῆς Καμπανίας τῇ Ἀρτέμιδι, ἀργυροῦν, ἐκ τῶν Ὁμηρικῶν ἐπῶν κατεσκευασμένον καὶ ἐντετυπωμένα ἔχον τὰ ἔπη χρυσοῖς γράμμασιν, ὡς τὸ Νέστορος ὄν. Athenaeus Deipnosophists XI 466e §1 Three major questions arise when one comes to consider the grammatika vases: who created them, for whom and… Read more

At the Table of the Gods? Divine Appetites and Animal Sacrifice

Citation with persistent identifier: Carbon, Jan-Mathieu (Mat). “At the Table of the Gods? Divine Appetites and Animal Sacrifice.”CHS Research Bulletin 5, no. 2 (2017). http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:CarbonM.At_the_Table_of_the_Gods.2017 Setting the Scene: Myths and Sacrifice 1§1 What did the Greek gods eat and drink? ‘Ambrosia’ and ‘nectar’ are the standard answers that any student of mythology would hurry to propose.[1] But was that always the case, whether in myth or in belief (as far as we… Read more

An Athenian Decree Revisited

Citation with persistent identifier: Doyen, Charles. “An Athenian Decree Revisited.” CHS Research Bulletin 4, no.1 (2015). http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:DoyenC.An_Athenian_Decree_Revisited.2016 Michel Fourmont’s Collection of Inscriptions 1§1 On September 1, 1728, François Sevin and Michel Fourmont, members of the Académie royale des inscriptions et belles-lettres, left Paris on a scientific journey to Constantinople (Omont 1902:537–662, 1078–1151). They were sent by King Louis XV and his minister, the Count of Maurepas, to collect Greek and oriental manuscripts from… Read more

Writing and the City in Later Roman Egypt. Towards a Social History of the Ancient “Scribe”

Citation with persistent identifier: Ast, Rodney. “Writing and the City in Later Roman Egypt. Towards a Social History of the Ancient ‘Scribe.’” CHS Research Bulletin 4, no. 1 (2015). http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:AstR.Writing_in_the_City_in_Later_Roman_Egypt.2016 Introduction* 1§1 This paper has its origin in a certain discontent with the one-dimensional way in which ancient writers are often described. The problem is part terminological: the title “scribe,” which properly denotes a professional copyist or clerk, is used very freely in… Read more

Abstract–Writing and the City in Late Roman Egypt. Towards a Social History of the Ancient “Scribe”

As part of a larger project on the practical application of literate education in antiquity, this paper highlights one segment of Roman society that dealt in reams of the written word: literate liturgists and members of the curial class. Municipal and state business was conducted by a body of individuals whose ability to write Greek varied. For some, written communication was a routine, albeit secondary, part of the liturgical duties… Read more

Connecting People: Mobility and Networks in the Corpus of Greek Private Letters

Citation with persistent identifier: Dana, Madalina. “Connecting People: Mobility and Networks in the Corpus of Greek Private Letters.” CHS Research Bulletin 3, no. 2 (2015). http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:DanaM.Connecting_People.2015 Introduction 1§1 The goal of this article[1] is primarily to highlight the phenomenon of letter writing from the city to its territory, from territory to territory or towards the interior, as an important expression of mobility attested in the extant corpus of private letters.… Read more

The Social Dynamics of Dedication in the Delian Inventories of the Third Century: Audience, Function and Temporality

Citation with persistent identifier: Constantakopoulou, Christy. “The Social Dynamics of Dedication in the Delian Inventories of the Third Century: Audience, Function and Temporality.” CHS Research Bulletin 3, no. 2 (2015). http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:ConstantakopoulouC.The_Social_Dynamics_of_Dedication.2015 Introduction 1§1 In the year 250 BCE, the hieropoioi, the Delian administrators of the sanctuary, produced an annual inventory, cataloguing the treasures kept in the sanctuary. This inventory is one of the few inventories of the third century that… Read more

Abstract–Connecting People: Mobility and Networks in the Corpus of Greek Private Letters

The goal of this article is primarily to highlight the phenomenon of the communication trough letter-writing from the city to its territory, from territory to territory or towards the inland regions, as a most important form of mobility in the corpus of Greek private letters. Entrusted to close relations or simply to passing people, who in turn confide it to other acquaintances, the letter travels a distance that its senders… Read more

Abstract–The Social Dynamics of Dedication in the Delian Inventories of the Third Century: Audience, Function and Temporality

My project explores the social dynamics of dedication, as they are reflected in the dedications recorded in the Delian inventories during the third century BC. The Delian practice of annually producing inventories of dedications is quite exceptional. Very few sanctuaries produce regular publication of their inventories; the practice is restricted to Athens and Attica, Delos, and to a lesser extent Didyma. The inventories of Athenian and Attic sanctuaries have attracted… Read more

Abstract–The Control of Emotion: Rhetorical Education and Civic Oratory in the Greco-Roman East

This paper focuses on the early stages of ancient rhetorical education, as a foundation for exploring the emotions involved in the composition and reception of ancient speeches in the Greek East of the Roman Empire in the early centuries AD. It concentrates on the progymnasmata, preliminary exercises in rhetorical composition, as evidenced by manuals, sample ‘fair copies’ of such exercises and school exercises on papyrus from Egypt. These sources are read as fragments… Read more

Prevention or Cure? Tax Exemptions in a Warfare Context: Miletus and the Low Valley of the Maeander (early second century BCE)

Citation with persistent identifier: Carrara, Aurélie.”Prevention or Cure? Tax Exemptions in a Warfare Context: Miletus and the Low Valley of the Maeander (early second century BCE).” CHS Research Bulletin 2, no. 2 (2014). http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:CarraraA:Prevention_or_Cure_Tax_Exemptions.2014 1§1 Taxation in ancient Greece had various purposes. The easiest to identify is the acquisition of the revenue needed to pay for the public expenditures. Taxation was also used to meet other specific needs of the… Read more

Οὐ τὸ νικᾶν ἀλλὰ τὸ εὖ ἀγωνίζεσθαι: Playing to win or to show off? Itinerant artists performing in unconventional ἀγῶνες in some decrees from…

Citation with persistent identifier: Cinalli, Angela. “Οὐ τὸ νικᾶν ἀλλὰ τὸ εὖ ἀγωνίζεσθαι: Playing to win or to show off? Itinerant artists performing in unconventional ἀγῶνες in some decrees from Delphi (third to first century BC).” CHS Research Bulletin 2, no. 2 (2014). http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:CinalliA.Playing_to_Win_or_to_Show_Off.2014 §1 In the cultural panorama of the Hellenistic Period, a significant space is occupied by itinerant professionals of literature and music who travelled from city to… Read more

Leisure Rules in Archaic Greece: Legislation on Inebriation and Foul Play in Literary and Epigraphic Sources

Citation with persistent identifier: Martín González, Elena. “Leisure Rules in Archaic Greece: Legislation on Inebriation and Foul Play in Literary and Epigraphic Sources.” CHS Research Bulletin 2, no. 2 (2014). http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:MartinGonzalezE.Leisure_Rules_in_Archaic_Greece.2014 1§1 Communal wine-drinking and athletic competition are the quintessential leisure activities in the Archaic Greek society. In the Homeric poems, the aristocratic elite is portrayed enjoying wine during feasts, an activity that enhances camaraderie and reinforces boundaries within the… Read more

The City at the Theater in Anatolia from the 260s to the 320s AD: Signs of a Major Transformation

Citation with persistent identifier: Pont, Anne-Valérie. “The City at the Theater in Anatolia from the 260s to the 320s AD: Signs of a Major Transformation.” CHS Research Bulletin 2, no. 2 (2014). http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hlnc.essay:PontAV.The_City_at_the_Theater_in_Anatolia_from_the_260s.2014 Introduction 1§1 The “theater” is, by definition and etymology, the scene of the performance, the place for looking at something.  From the Greek classical world up to the civic societies of the Greek part of the Roman Empire,… Read more

Abstract–The City at the Theater in Anatolia from the 260s to the 320s AD: Signs of a Major Transformation

Life in the cities of Asia Minor between the 260s and the 320s is rarely studied: there is a bibliographical gap for the period between High Empire and Late Antiquity. Different sources, of an epigraphic, literary, juridical, hagiographic or patristic nature, nevertheless allow for the analysis of the modes of community life on a local scale and of its new dynamics. The uses of the theater and the collective emotions… Read more

Abstract–“Οὐ τὸ νικᾶν ἀλλὰ τὸ εὖ ἀγωνίζεσθαι" Playing to Win or to Show Off? Itinerant Artists Performing in Unconventional ἀγῶνες in Some Decrees from…

The epigraphic documentation of Hellenistic Delphi testifies to an extremely active involvement of the poeti vaganti in a dynamic and prolific cultural life. Aside the ἀγῶνες, the inscriptions attest to various kinds of individual performances, helping us to reconstruct at different levels the activity of performers of music and literature in the city. A group of decrees, which has interested scholars because of their numerous distinctive features, suggests the activity… Read more

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